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Soliciting Multiversity: DC’s Top 10 in October 2014

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by Brian Salvatore

The DC lineup for October is getting shaken up in, perhaps, the most serious way since the start of the New 52. New books, new creative teams, and some serious new storylines all start here.

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Wrapping Wednesday: Micro Reviews for the Week of 7/9/14

There is a lot to cover on Wednesdays. We should know, as collectively, we read an insane amount of comics. Even with a large review staff, it’s hard to get to everything. With that in mind, we’re back with Wrapping Wednesday, where we look at some of the books we missed in what was another great week of comics.

Let’s get this party started.

“Fables: The Wolf Among Us” is a Powerful, Thrilling and Complex Noir Hidden in Sheep’s Clothing [Review]

by James Johnston

The Wolf Among Us, Telltale’s adaption of the wildly popular Vertigo comic “Fables”, started just like its source material: with a murder that rocked the community of Fabletown, the hidden borough in New York City housing refugees from a fairytale world that was conquered by a ruthless adversary. Just as the murder in “Fables” #1 led to something much more (or arguably much less), the killings in Telltale’s The Wolf Among Us don’t just lead to some events that had been mentioned off-panel in the comics, but to the very creation of Fabletown as we know it.

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Vertigo Announces “The Kitchen,” a New Mini by Ollie Masters and Ming Doyle [Preview]

by Matthew Meylikhov

Announced at Vertigo’s site and featured in the latest DC All Access, a brand new 8-issue mini has been unveiled entitled “The Kitchen.”

Written by Ollie Masters, illustrated by Ming Doyle, colored by Jordie Bellaire and with at least one cover by Becky Cloonan, the book takes place in NYC during the 70′s disco/punk era boom, as well as during the Summer of Sam and more. With the titular Kitchen referencing both Hell’s Kitchen and being a pit of an obvious, poking pun, the series follows a group of mob wives who take up the family business when their husbands are in jail, and is described as “Goodfellas meets Mob Wives.”

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Wrapping Wednesday: Micro Reviews for the Week of 6/18/14

by the Multiversity Staff

There is a lot to cover on Wednesdays. We should know, as collectively, we read an insane amount of comics. Even with a large review staff, it’s hard to get to everything. With that in mind, we’re back with Wrapping Wednesday, where we look at some of the books we missed in what was another great week of comics.

Let’s get this party started.

The Former King of Comics: A Personal Retrospective of Vertigo

Once upon a time, Vertigo Comics was the gateway drug of choice for many readers looking for something more from their comics. But has that day passed, with options like Image, digital comics, self-published books, and more?

One editor explores this idea through the prism of his own experience with Vertigo as an imprint, and whether there is a place in tomorrow’s comics for them.

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Comics Should Be Cheap! (6/11/2014)

by The Multiversity Comics Staff

Buying comics can be an expensive hobby. A lot of fans simply can’t afford everything they’re interested in, due to rising prices and the over-saturation of the market with superhero titles.

That’s why we’re here. Every week, the Multiversity staff is asked “What would you buy this week if you couldn’t go over $20?” and shares their reasons why, in order to help others who might have similar tastes make their own decisions in buying comics on a budget. Be sure to leave your own picks in the comments!

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Review: The Wake #9

by Matt Dodge

With only one issue left to go, Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy are determined to cram as much future dystopian goodness as possible into “The Wake” #9, and set up a thrilling conclusion.

There was a point around issue three or four of “The Wake” when it seemed fair to wonder how the creators planned to stretch the tale of scientists trapped under water with monsters into ten issues. If even the crew got picked off by the terrifying mermaids at a rate of one per issue, it would still fall a little short. But then they literally blew the entire thing up and catapulted the entire stories decades into the future. Instantly the world of Leeward, her dolphin companion, and the band of lovable rapscallions that forms around them, threatens to make every issue burst at the seams.

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Soliciting Multiversity: DC’s Top Ten for August 2014

by Brian Salvatore

August solicitations, since the advent of the New 52, have been unusual. For many of the books, this is the final stand, either for a long-simmering story, or for the book in general. For others, it is a place for an unnatural pause, as September’s event month comes crashing in, placing a pin in everything building up to this month. So, this month’s list isn’t so much a top ten books I’m looking forward to, but more of a top ten news stories/books I’m looking forward to. Let’s get to it.

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Review: Vertigo Quarterly: Cyan

by Zach Wilkerson

With both style and substance to spare, “Vertigo Quarterly” begins its year long ode to four color comics with a mixed but enjoyable batch of stories.

“Vertigo Quarterly” is an unexpected but welcome surprise from DC’s wayward mature readers imprint. We’ve seen similar anthology one-shots released over the past few years, such as “Strange Adventures” and “Mystery in Space.” However, “Quarterly,” or “CMYK” as it is also known, feels like a much more sincere effort, combining a strong theme with fresh creative talent in a year long endeavor.

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